GPL Source Code



  • @Theodore-Borromeo I had actually thought about soldering a 64MB flash on mine, but heck, all that large chips I can find cost more than the Omega 2 itself -- not worth it.



  • @Theodore-Borromeo soldering flash chip could be major PITA, because you'll have to remove the metal shield first.

    @Costas-Costas the ability to connect to an access point is in the minimal package. There is no GUI for it. You will have to edit two files:
    /etc/config/wireless
    and
    /etc/config/network

    Here is my network file. I disabled the lan bridge and the ethernet, since I don't use them. The configured the wireless wlan0 to use dhcp.
    http://pastebin.com/FkN5nrAk

    Here is my wireless config. My network uses WPA2. The LEDE web site has decent docs on these files.
    http://pastebin.com/UgUDRsis



  • @WereCatf no doubt. the idea that it's an option just takes me back to the glory days of mask ROMs on a SNES cartridge ( I am NOT old enough to be hearkening back that far). recently someone did it with the flash memory on an iPhone, but I totally don't intend for anyone to go that far.

    I honestly thought that this would have been the major revision with the omega2s over the omegas. I honestly wished that they would have made a much larger leap in processing power and memory just based on the immediate limitations on the original once it became clear that it kind of didn't deliver out of the box expectations w.r.t. node.js etc.

    It's interesting to see where omega is supposed to thrive though, based on the price point and feature sets. I honestly hope they abandon their current course and pivot to open hardware with integrated node red. They could then focus on creating a handheld PC like the pocket chip ( or partnering) that could communicate with the omega wifi ap to program things offline, with tutorials embedded into the 'host' computer. if each kit were under $100, they could kick-start or have local schools launch go fund mes to purchase kits for local schools.

    as a side note, it'd be an interesting company to start that templates GoFundMe campaigns for local schools/organizations. you could reuse a lot of the base work to commoditize projects, and then make your profit by minimizing overhead via spreading the development cost over the multiple campaigns. I don't think there is any organization now that will help you fundraise in that way, barring what little I know about classy. . .



  • @luz said in GPL Source Code:

    LEDE has done its first release, 17.01 - and Omega2/Omega2p support is included!

    Techdata (i added pictures to see how they look like)



  • @Luciano-S. So does Onion still need to release more of their source code to be compliant with GPL? Example, do they need to release the source for their custom wifi driver?



  • @Chris-Ouellette in the meantime (it‘s a year later now) they have published their LEDE tree.

    But yes, that does not include the proprietary WiFi driver. AFAIK it is allowed to have such a closed driver, but I totally don‘t get why they put their effort into hard to maintain and use proprietary stuff instead of helping to improve the open mt76 wifi driver! mt76 has improved a lot over the course of last year, but it could still use some refinement regarding performance and sometimes stability of connections.

    Unfortunately, looking at the github repo, there seems not much going on regarding Omega2 firmware development anyway. The last commit is from September, substantial changes more than 6 months ago.



  • @luz

    Unfortunately, looking at the github repo, there seems not much going on regarding Omega2 firmware development anyway. The last commit is from September, substantial changes more than 6 months ago.

    I think it's a reasonable assumption that there is a private repo for the oboo clock (closed source) and all the current application and firmware development effort is taking place there and is focused on that.

    Since that is the current commercial focus of the company (oboo powered by Omega2s), it's unlikely we will see much further activity on the open source repos and Omega2/+ unless there is further commercial gains to be had from it.

    Although I may be wrong, that's just my opinion.



  • @cas said in GPL Source Code:

    @luz

    Unfortunately, looking at the github repo, there seems not much going on regarding Omega2 firmware development anyway. The last commit is from September, substantial changes more than 6 months ago.

    I think it's a reasonable assumption that there is a private repo for the oboo clock (closed source) and all the current application and firmware development effort is taking place there and is focused on that.

    Since that is the current commercial focus of the company (oboo powered by Omega2s), it's unlikely we will see much further activity on the open source repos and Omega2/+ unless there is further commercial gains to be had from it.

    Although I may be wrong, that's just my opinion.

    i agree. hope i'm wrong. thing i don't understand about the company is all the bs mis-information that they feed the supporters. like back in july when they announced the new wi-fi that would be ready end of august, then changed to sept. or "3rd quarter" just crap. and this is to the people that brought them close to 1 million dollars. i fully expect it continue to the oboo supporters. onion has become by their own actions a cult of mis-information. i see they gave themselves 6 months before they even have to start thinking about shipping with the oboo. my guess is they developed an alarm clock because nobody but the boss was showing up to work on time. they probably all hate the place. and it shows.



  • @cas said in GPL Source Code:

    I think it's a reasonable assumption that there is a private repo for the oboo clock (closed source) and all the current application and firmware development effort is taking place there and is focused on that.

    Very likely, yes.

    That they want to keep the oboo-specifics closed, I can understand.

    But what I really think is plain stupid, even from a commercial point of view, is that they do not work in the open improving their OpenWrt/LEDE tree for the Omega2 platform.

    They could serve both the oboo project and their Omega2 customers! But how they do it now alienates the Omega2 maker community, instead of involving it.

    It's "wow, they build something cool and professional based on the Omega2 platform, I could do that, too" vs. "oh, they are no longer interested in the Omega2 platform they sold me and doing something entirely different".

    I hoped the oboo clock would help bringing the Omega2 forward as a platform. Now it looks like the result will be the opposite :-(

    Really, @onion, it's not that hard!

    I can tell because I'm doing exactly this. I do commercial products based on Omega2+LEDE 17.01 for a living. And I have a number of fully open fun projects also based on the same platform (pixelboard, a LoRA gateway, a DC motor controller...).
    Only a few packages related to my commercial products are not public (such as the site specific updater tool). The rest is the same for all projects, and open! Including things like a kernel driver for WS28xx LED chains or making i2s sound work to play MOD sounds...

    And guess what? I'm doing it that way primarily because it is the most efficient way to get stuff done! I could not do all that if I had to worry about a separate LEDE for each project, all the back- and forth merging etc.

    And OpenWrt/LEDE is a phantastic environment to do exactly that. No problem to have a public and a private feed to organize different projects. The only thing I had to do, to make my workflow really smooth, was to write a little shell script that allows to apply a diffconfig plus some tree-wide patches (e.g. this one to make SPI work) for a certain project to a virgin LEDE checkout.

    This way I can make use of the enormous and continuous work that goes into OpenWrt/LEDE every day, and others can make use of my work as they see fit.

    I really don't get how Onion can miss out on the benefits of a more open development.



  • @luz
    Fully agree.
    When I embarked on this journey with Onion, I expected that I would be responsible for all the wires and resistors etc. and expected that Onion would take care of the software side, keeping everything up to date.
    I didn't expect to have to manage the entire software ecosystem as well and so the lustre is a little less now and the excitement has suffered a bit too. Rather than focus on making, I'm constantly distracted by the 'what ifs' surrounding the software, such as is it worth the investment of my time knowing that at some point there will be a critical security flaw that I cannot defend against.

    However, there's an opportunity to learn and help others so it's not altogether a lost cause just yet and so I carry on in the hopes that at some point in the future @onion will pop out of the woodwork with a "Bazinga! Here's all the software improvements we've been working on in secret for the last 12 months."


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