Omega2+ hot hot hot



  • Something like that can't be a direct short across a power rail, otherwise the system wouldn't be functional.

    Instead it would need to be a short between a component and a power rail, a damaged section of a chip, or (part of?) a chip that is habitually operating in latchup, perhaps as a result of previous damage such ESD, overvoltage on the power supply or an I/O, etc.



  • @Chris-Stratton Thanks for the explanation. I suspect that it may be an overvoltage on the power supply. If that is the case, then I guess there is no remedy except to throw away the board.. Correct?



  • @Akshat-Mehra What are you using for a power supply? Have you verified that the voltage at the Omega power pins is 3.3 V?



  • @Mark-B Now, I am using a bench-top power supply and I have checked that it supplies a 3.3 Volts using a DMM. But earlier I used a USB to serial 3V3 FTDI cable to supply power to omega2+ without checking its output. Although it was rated 3V3 but the output was +5V as shown on a DMM, which may have damaged the board.



  • It;s live and learn, unfortunately.
    These active semiconductor devices cannot tolerate severe over-voltage, even in several seconds range.
    It is just that fast, poof (can't hear it and no smoke coming out though) it's a goner.

    P.S. there is no fuse protection nor Zener diode clamping down the supply voltage thus it's all on the end users' due-diligence.

    P.S. 2 I even have a very old $$$$ HP lab bench power supply which will exhibit higher voltage when I power it off. It did cook some of my premium toys (much more than $9 Omega 2+.) I have since added a second power cut-off switch on its output side. Live and learn too,.

    ccs_hello



  • @Akshat-Mehra Sorry to hear that. I've done similar things an embarrassing number of times, some of them far more visually spectacular.



  • Yeah.. Its gone now.. :-(



  • @Akshat-Mehra said in Omega2+ hot hot hot:

    @Mark-B ... earlier I used a USB to serial 3V3 FTDI cable to supply power to omega2+ without checking its output. Although it was rated 3V3 but the output was +5V as shown on a DMM, which may have damaged the board.

    Sorry Akshat. For next time, here is a nice $7 American made UART board with 3.3 or 5V switched supply and 3.3V signal lines.



  • That board is not good enough.
    MCP1703 linear IC regulator 3.3V output's max output current is 250 mA.



  • @ccs-hello said in Omega2+ hot hot hot:

    That board is not good enough.
    MCP1703 linear IC regulator 3.3V output's max output current is 250 mA.

    Yes, I see now that the MCP1703 is rated to only 250mA. The maker claims his UART supplies up to 400mA at 3.3V. Have one here, I'll run Mark B's wifi load test and get back to you. Might be that this unit is ok for an Omega set-up, but not best for an installation.


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